Diving Llyn Y Fan Fach

This is an adventure walk with a difference. At the highest point of the walk is Llyn Y Fan Fach which I planned to solo dive, before heading back down off the hills to the cars.

It starts with an easy four-mile walk in the west of the Brecon Beacons National Park along a bustling river. However, as per most of my adventures, this one didn’t quite go to plan, when Matthew, one of my support team, drove into the back of my car on the way to the dive site, writing off my car. So it started off bad!

Once I got to the carpark, we met Kerry who was to be my safety support. I’d prepacked the kit I required into manageable loads, and we all took one. After a quick brief, we set off on the four mile hike to the lake.

From the car park (Sat Nav: SA19 9UP Grid Ref: SN 79996 23800), you just head along the reservoir road alongside the river all the way to the lake.

Llyn y Fan Fach sits beneath the precipitous ridgeline of Bannau Sir Gaer. It’s an epic scene, the remnants of the landscape’s glacial past clearly visible in all directions. The lake is a real wildlife haven. Look out for fish as they flip on the water’s surface, while up in the sky, riding the thermals, you’re likely to see red kites, buzzards, carrion crows and kestrels.

At the head of the lake is a small bothy hut, that we utilized as our base camp. It was beyond rustic, but perfect for sheltering out of the elements as it was driving rain and high winds.

I got changed into my dive kit, then myself, Kerry and Matthew headed around to the edge of the lake, whilst Scott stayed with the kit in the hut.

It was quiet an awe inspiring place to dive, underneath the jagged ridgeline that towered above, and all too aware of the sluice gate in the lake that controlled the flow of water from the lake to the water pumping stations far down the valley.

I did my final checks, Kerry double checked everything with me, then I entered the water.

As dives go, it was disappointing and boring! Nothing to see. Just a sandy bottom that dropped quiet steeply to nearly twenty metres. I had an explore around and headed back up.

I got out of the water and was met by Kerry and Matt who helped me ashore, and then led the way back to the bothy hut.

After I de-kitted, warmed up and got my walking kit back on, it was time to descend.

All in all a great day out, with a good team. Many thanks go to Kerry, Matt and Scott for assisting me in my madness!

Here is a video of the adventure. If you would like to join me on one of my adventures, please get in touch.

Published by Diving & Mountaineering Instructor

I am a passionate adventurer, loving being in the mountains walking, climbing, scrambling as much as I love being under the water exploring shipwrecks, mines and caverns, or in search of treasure in the depths. I am a Mountain Instructor (MIA), a Winter Mountain Leader, a Scuba Diving Instructor (BSAC, TDI, SDI, IANTD), a skipper for CAT3 waters up to 25mtr and as I’ve built this experience over time, I have written about it and published those works. In addition I am a Chartered Manager with CILT, a member of the institute of Engineering & Technology, a Fellow of the Institute of Leadership & Management and a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society. I help people fulfill their goals in the Mountains (Worldwide), Scuba Diving (Worldwide), provide location support worldwide for the media and assist with technical and safety support whenever requested. For a full picture of me please check out my linkedin profile - https://www.linkedin.com/in/marklewisfinstlm

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